CLDF Title
Home | Contact Us | Bookmark
HBV HE HCC HCV
About CLDF Centers of Educational Expertise  
CME Dinner Meetings Telewebs Webcasts Slide Library Abstract Library Conference Highlights
 
Back  
 
Reuters Health Information (2011-07-22): Metformin improves outcomes in diabetics with hep C cirrhosis

Clinical

Metformin improves outcomes in diabetics with hep C cirrhosis

Last Updated: 2011-07-22 13:31:31 -0400 (Reuters Health)

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Patients with type 2 diabetes who also have liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection fare significantly better when they're treated with metformin, results of a French study indicate.

"Metformin treatment was independently associated with a decrease in HCC (hepatocellular carcinoma) occurrence and with a decreased rate of liver-related death," the researchers report in the August Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

The authors point out that type 2 diabetes and hyperinsulinemia are common in patients with HCV cirrhosis, and there's evidence that insulin resistance plays a role in the development of liver cancer. Therefore, treatment with metformin could be beneficial in this setting.

To investigate, Dr. Emmanuel Cosson, with Hopital Jean Verdier in Bondy, and colleagues studied 100 patients with compensated HCV cirrhosis and type 2 diabetes, including 26 who took metformin.

Over a median of 5.7 years, 39 patients developed HCC and 33 either died of liver-related causes or had a liver transplant.

The team found that the five-year rate of HCC was 9.5% in metformin-treated patients vs 31.2% in patients who didn't take the drug. On multivariate analysis, metformin was independently associated with reduced risk of HCC (hazard ratio 0.19, p=0.023).

Similarly, the corresponding rate of death or transplantation was 5.9% vs. 17.4% in the two groups, respectively. This translated to an adjusted hazard ratio for death/transplantation of 0.22 (p=0.049), Dr. Cosson and colleagues report.

They note that this was an observational study, so cause and effect cannot be determined. "However, our findings add to the increasing body of evidence and may justify the initiation of clinical trials evaluating metformin in patients with hyperinsulinemia and HCV cirrhosis," they conclude.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/pGSdvM

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2011.

 
 
 
 
                 
 
HBV
Webcasts
Slide Library
Abstract Library
 
HE
CME Dinner Meeting
Webcasts
Slide Library
Abstract Library
 
HCC
Slide Library
Abstract Library
 
 
HCV
Webcasts
Slide Library
Abstract Library
 
CLDF Follow Us
   
 
About CLDF
Mission Statement
Board of Trustees
Board of Advisors
CLDF Supporters
 
Other Resources
Liver News Library
Journal Abstracts
Hep C Link to Care
 
Centers of
Educational Expertise
Regional Map
     
   
  The Chronic Liver Disease Foundation is a non-profit organization with content developed specifically for healthcare professionals.
© Copyright 2012-2014 Chronic Liver Disease Foundation. All rights reserved. This site is maintained as an educational resource for US healthcare providers only.
Use of this Web site is governed by the Chronic Liver Disease Foundation terms of use and privacy statement.